Verboticism: Behavioristicpokalotofme

'Please keep your tongue to the left!'

DEFINITION: n. The feelings of apprehension which occur when undergoing a medical examination. v. To feel discomfort while a medical professional pokes and prods at the weak points of your body.

Create | Read

Behavioristicpokalotofme

Created by: abrakadeborah

Pronunciation: be-hav-ior-is-tik-poke-a-lot-of-me

Sentence: Debeeznormal, was laid out on her stomach on an odd "V" shaped surgical table with her behind stuck way up in the air...as she was shivering in the cold as ice operating room and petrified of her "behavioristicpokalotofme" preparations that the Doctors and nurses were doing to her, to have her hardware removed from her back. Thank goodness they knocked her out with more joy-juice to save her from the embarrassing "behavioristicpokalotofme" position!

Etymology: Behavior:The manner of conducting oneself.I added "istic" to show a play on the word behavior to show a type of behavior exhibited while being stuck by a medical device or tool. Poke:To make a prodding, jabbing, or thrusting movement especially repeatedly. Alot: A considerable quantity or extent. Of: Used as a function word to indicate something from which a person or thing is delivered. Me:(I used as to pertain to me,myself and I...or could be yourself? lol! formal Etymology lesson :)>) Middle English, from Old English mē; akin to Old High German mīh me, Latin me, Greek me, Sanskrit mā objective case of "I" usage Me is used in many constructions where strict grammarians prescribe "I". This usage is not so much ungrammatical as indicative of the shrinking range of the nominative form: me began to replace "I" sometime around the 16th century largely because of the pressure of word order. "I" is now chiefly used as the subject of an immediately following verb. Me occurs in every other position: absolutely , emphatically , and after prepositions, conjunctions, and verbs, including be . Almost all usage books recognize the legitimacy of me in these positions, especially in speech; some recommend "I" in formal and especially written contexts after be and after as and than when the first term of the comparison is the subject of a verb.

Points: 896

Vote For