Verboticism: Cusspletive

'What did you just call me?'

DEFINITION: v. To use alternative "code words" instead of proper cuss words, in an effort to satisfy people offended by such vulgarisms. n. A word used as a replacement for an obscene or profane expletive.

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Cusspletive

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Eupheckmism

petaj

Created by: petaj

Pronunciation: you-feck-miz-m

Sentence: Gordon Ramsay's kitchen nightmares had to be dubbed with eupheckmisms before it could be screened on the family viewing channel.

Etymology: euphemism (word or phrase used to stand in for a taboo word, or topic that is unpleasant to talk about) + feck (irish eupheckmism for the f word)

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COMMENTS:

Good one, petaj...Gordon Ramsay was a feckin' eejit long before it was fashionable to be so... - Nosila, 2008-05-08: 23:19:00

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Furse

Created by: ethanb

Pronunciation: furs

Sentence: Jay uses furses around his catholic mother to avoid her ire, but in normal company he cusses like a sailor.

Etymology: "curse" + "farce"

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Expletute

mrskellyscl

Created by: mrskellyscl

Pronunciation: ex-pleh-toot

Sentence: Mommy often had to expletute words around the baby, who was beginning to show an uncanny ability to imitate her speech patterns, especially when she was having a discussion with daddy about golf.

Etymology: expletive: vulgar or coarse word to express emotion + substitute: a replacement

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Morfiting

Created by: WarriorCatGoddess

Pronunciation: More-fit-ing

Sentence: The boy was morfiting at his teacher for giving him an F on his quiz.

Etymology:

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Marsecode

Created by: Jabberwocky

Pronunciation: marss/code

Sentence: Marsecode, derived from marseholecode is used by people who feel more comfortable using only morsels of bad language.

Etymology: Morse code + arse

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COMMENTS:

you brits kill me. - stache, 2008-05-08: 08:20:00

I like it. - OZZIEBOB, 2008-05-08: 19:36:00

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Codeverse

Created by: Stevenson0

Pronunciation: code/vurs

Sentence: Around the office, us lackies have to codeverse so we don't offend the boss, or her prim and proper manager with our foul language. When angry at a co-worker, we often shout at them "Go f'coffee!", or "Eat hit, you bit head!", but so far our codeversations haven't raised the ire of the language police.

Etymology: code + converse (To engage in spoken exchange)

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Cusspletive

Created by: abrakadeborah

Pronunciation: cus-ple-tive

Sentence: Just because you use cusspletive words around me...don't think I'm too old to not know what you're really calling me!

Etymology: Cuss - Alteration of curse. Pletive - taken in part from 'expletive'- An interjectory word or expression, frequently profane.

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Procovertanity

Created by: phoenix89

Pronunciation: Pro - covert - an -it-e

Sentence: Sometimes children curse when they shouldnt or when they are angry. To avoid punishment for using profanity they do it covertly and call it " procovertanity ".

Etymology: Profanity (profane conduct or language) Covert ( to conceal , disguise , or do in secrecy)

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Subterpheme

Created by: stache

Pronunciation: sŭb'tər-fēm'

Sentence: "GOT DANDRUFF, SOMEOFITITCHES!" Grandpa shouted his well-known subterpheme, as he bonked his thumb with the ball-peen hammer for the third time.

Etymology: 'sub,' short for underwater marine vessel, also used to describe an oversized sandwich served on long bread; 'terph,' alt. of turf, locale where one finds one's homies; 'eme,' collapsed form of e-me, avatar used as an on-line representation of oneself.

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Subterfeud

Created by: pieceof314

Pronunciation: sub-ter-fyood

Sentence: Marvin mumbled under his breath, "You rockem sockem, bean pole ridin, frickin, dung eating, rear end of a moose's petutie." "What?" responded his partner, "You can certainly come up with better subterfeud than that, can't you?" "Uh, what a BEACH!"

Etymology: subterfuge, Late Latin subterfugium, from Latin subterfugere to escape, evade, from subter- secretly (from subter underneath; + fugere to flee + feud, a mutual enmity or quarrel that is often prolonged or inveterate

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