Verboticism: Fakeswear

'What did you just call me?'

DEFINITION: v. To use alternative "code words" instead of proper cuss words, in an effort to satisfy people offended by such vulgarisms. n. A word used as a replacement for an obscene or profane expletive.

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Expletute

mrskellyscl

Created by: mrskellyscl

Pronunciation: ex-pleh-toot

Sentence: Mommy often had to expletute words around the baby, who was beginning to show an uncanny ability to imitate her speech patterns, especially when she was having a discussion with daddy about golf.

Etymology: expletive: vulgar or coarse word to express emotion + substitute: a replacement

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Placeboath

Created by: Tigger

Pronunciation: (like 'placebo') /pluh-SEE-bohth/

Sentence: Sandra, a mother of three children and a former radio DJ, had trained herself never to swear, but she would often use placeboaths in place of profanity. So, when she yelled at Bobby, "Cheese and Crackers!! Get your gosh darn feet off the coffee table and stop acting like a fudging sugarhead!" nobody thought it was unusual. After all, Bobby really had been acting like a sugarhead.

Etymology: Placebo - a medication prescribed more for the mental relief of the patient than for its actual effect (Latin, placebo "I shall please") + Oath - any profane expression; curse; swearword (from Middle English, ooth "swear" [to a god or diety])

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COMMENTS:

an elegant creation, I must say - stache, 2008-05-08: 08:22:00

very nice - Jabberwocky, 2008-05-08: 14:21:00

Terrific! - OZZIEBOB, 2008-05-08: 19:37:00

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Subterfeud

Created by: pieceof314

Pronunciation: sub-ter-fyood

Sentence: Marvin mumbled under his breath, "You rockem sockem, bean pole ridin, frickin, dung eating, rear end of a moose's petutie." "What?" responded his partner, "You can certainly come up with better subterfeud than that, can't you?" "Uh, what a BEACH!"

Etymology: subterfuge, Late Latin subterfugium, from Latin subterfugere to escape, evade, from subter- secretly (from subter underneath; + fugere to flee + feud, a mutual enmity or quarrel that is often prolonged or inveterate

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Eupheckmism

petaj

Created by: petaj

Pronunciation: you-feck-miz-m

Sentence: Gordon Ramsay's kitchen nightmares had to be dubbed with eupheckmisms before it could be screened on the family viewing channel.

Etymology: euphemism (word or phrase used to stand in for a taboo word, or topic that is unpleasant to talk about) + feck (irish eupheckmism for the f word)

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COMMENTS:

Good one, petaj...Gordon Ramsay was a feckin' eejit long before it was fashionable to be so... - Nosila, 2008-05-08: 23:19:00

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Subterpheme

Created by: stache

Pronunciation: sŭb'tər-fēm'

Sentence: "GOT DANDRUFF, SOMEOFITITCHES!" Grandpa shouted his well-known subterpheme, as he bonked his thumb with the ball-peen hammer for the third time.

Etymology: 'sub,' short for underwater marine vessel, also used to describe an oversized sandwich served on long bread; 'terph,' alt. of turf, locale where one finds one's homies; 'eme,' collapsed form of e-me, avatar used as an on-line representation of oneself.

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Ooophemism

Created by: galwaywegian

Pronunciation: ooooooo fem iz em

Sentence: They used several ooophemisms including a poophemism, some brewphemisms and several screwphemisms.

Etymology: oooooooh, euphemism

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COMMENTS:

oooooooh - love it - Jabberwocky, 2008-05-08: 14:20:00

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Heckspletive

artr

Created by: artr

Pronunciation: hek-spli-tiv

Sentence: As the pastor of his church John can't use profane language. As a human that is subject to anger or pain, he has found his own set of heckspletives to get him through these times. Where someone else might say "Shut the F___ up", John will say "Hush the frog up". Where someone else might tell someone to "Go to Hell", John smiles tells them to "have a nice time at the BBQ". Even though he gets blank stares sometimes, he feels better that he knows what he meant.

Etymology: heck (used as a mild expression of annoyance, rejection, disgust, etc.) + expletive (an interjectory word or expression, frequently profane; an exclamatory oath)

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Codeverse

Created by: Stevenson0

Pronunciation: code/vurs

Sentence: Around the office, us lackies have to codeverse so we don't offend the boss, or her prim and proper manager with our foul language. When angry at a co-worker, we often shout at them "Go f'coffee!", or "Eat hit, you bit head!", but so far our codeversations haven't raised the ire of the language police.

Etymology: code + converse (To engage in spoken exchange)

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Proxpletive

artr

Created by: artr

Pronunciation: präksplitiv

Sentence: ”What the fudge is wrong with you? You’re a frickin rock star”, fumed Iggy’s manager. ”You’re supposed to be a hard-brass who curses like a sailor and the best we can get out of you is a proxpletive”.

Etymology: proxy (a person authorized to act on behalf of another) + expletive (an oath or swear word)

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Parracore

Created by: tyler775

Pronunciation: /par * ah * ka * ore/

Sentence: Whenever our boss acts very rule and demanding, we call him the parracore 'flux bucket' behind his back.

Etymology: *Parra- from Greek prefix Para- meaning apart from or abnormal. *Suffix -core from English which meant stubborn or unyielding prior to 1930s

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